20 Best Things to Do in Vienna – The Trend Spotter

An Idiosyncratic Designer, a Serene New Home

20 Best Things to Do in Vienna - The Trend Spotter
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POINT REYES, Calif.

IT is midday in Leonard Koren’s studio, a spare, white rectangle overlooking Tomales Bay, the slim finger of water that outlines the top of the San Andreas Fault. Mr.

Koren, who carries the awkward job title of design philosopher, was explaining personal causalities: how a Viennese flower shop healed his broken heart, for instance, and how a disco radio station propelled him and his partner, Emilia Burchiellaro, into a happy exile on the edge of a wildlife refuge an hour north of San Francisco.

Mr. Koren, 62, who studied architecture at the University of California at Los Angeles, has long enjoyed a kind of quiet notoriety among design lovers. He is the founder and publisher of the ’70s-era cult magazine Wet — its impish mandate, “a magazine about gourmet bathing,” came to Mr.

Koren while he was taking a bath and allowed for articles on nude beaches and the drug Ecstasy, and contributions from Matt Groening, Leonard Cohen and Paul Bowles. More recently, Mr.

Koren has been known as a maker of deceptively modest books about deceptively modest subjects (raking leaves, arranging objects).

While Mr. Koren’s pursuits are idiosyncratic, the artifacts they produce — more than a dozen slim paperbacks designed (right down to the typeface) and written by Mr. Koren — have an uncanny habit of colliding with the zeitgeist. They are anti-coffee- table books for the coffee-table-book set.

“Wabi-Sabi for Artists, Designers, Poets and Philosophers,” first published in 1994, presented the Japanese notion of imperfect or humble beauty — you know the look, splintered driftwood against a winter sky, or a single flower past its prime.

The book became a talking point for a wasteful culture intent on penitence and a touchstone for designers of all stripes, including some makers of luxury goods. Though the work was initially designed without a bar code (in keeping with its antidigital philosophy and to the annoyance of distributors, who, Mr.

Koren said, charged a 20-cent “inconvenience fee” for some years), it has been a steady earner, with over 100,000 copies sold to date.

Since Mr. Koren is not an academic, financing his interests has been a creative act in itself. Happily, corporations reach out to him as a trend spotter and early adopter. A few years ago, General Mills asked him and other creative types to brainstorm a new product for its snack business.

Swarovski, the crystal maker, flew him to Paris to interview the industrial designer Arik Levy at Mr. Levy’s request; Mr. Levy said Mr. Koren was the only design writer he could understand. And this fall, Mr.

Koren will follow George Sowden, another industrial designer and a founder of the Memphis Group, who is working on producing his housewares at a more local level. The two are also collaborating on a book documenting this process.

“Leonard is a philosopher,” Mr. Sowden said the other day. “Because he makes you think about things in a different way. But he’s not dogmatic. He’s a relativist. The books are not empty books; they are not minimalist. You have to appreciate that. If you are looking for opinions, you won’t find them. If you asked me what Leonard believes in, I would say he is a believer in not believing.”

That point is debatable. Mr. Koren, who was dressed a schoolboy, in a blue-striped oxford cloth shirt and blue jeans, certainly has a lot to say. He was cranky about a former neighbor, and wrung out by a legal tussle with his ex-wife. Mr.

Koren’s appealingly irritable sensibility is woven through his new book, out this month and titled “which ‘aesthetics’ do you mean? ten definitions.” (The lowercase is intentional.

) With it, he has waded in with the big boys to wrestle some meaning a word that has bedeviled him for decades, he said.

“Every time I saw the word in print it put me in this questioning mode,” he said.

“What does the author mean by it? Is it a highfalutin synonym to get a little more texture and variety in their writing?” The result — a primer with a memoir embedded in it — manages to be both high minded and very funny: “Objects scavenged from the Manhattan sewers were used to create the edgy aesthetics of Bob’s downtown loft,” writes Mr. Koren, using that sentence to demonstrate one of his 10 definitions of the “a” word.

Mr. Koren and Ms. Burchiellaro’s aesthetic — spare, bright and modern — is not particularly edgy, but it is pricey. Their house, which is 1,200 square feet of glass and bleached-out cedar on a quarter acre, was built in 1987, and cost just over $1 million when Mr. Koren bought it as a weekend place a few years ago.

At the time, they were living uneasily in an apartment in Telegraph Hill in San Francisco, sharing the building with a downstairs neighbor who worked at home and had a passion for disco music, which, they say, she d to play at top volume for much of the day.

At first, they tried to manage their discomfort by listening to the same radio station — said Ms. Burchiellaro, who had just arrived back at the house with Marco, their 2 ½-year old, and was picking up the loud-neighbor tale so Mr. Koren could greet his son.

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“We figured out what the station was, because we thought maybe it would be better to actually listen to the music than to absorb the vibrations passively,” Ms. Burchiellaro, a graphic designer, added. “She told us she was afraid of silence.”

After Marco was born, things deteriorated. They tried mediation, they said, but the flummoxed mediator, a retired judge, advised: “Just get out. Sell the place and forget it.” A few weeks later, they did sell and moved full time to Point Reyes.

“We had no intention of living full time in the country,” Mr. Koren said. But, he added, “Over the last two years we’ve begun relaxing into our fate. Although Emilia is aching to do some extensive remodeling, I’m in a happily appreciative mode. I’m grateful. No. 1, to be alive. No.

2, that I’m in a place that is conducive for working and living. If you’re a somewhat balanced person, but not necessarily a super-positive person, state of mind is extremely important.

You can’t work on something about beauty — that is, beauty is irrelevant, if you’re mired in all kinds of muck.”

POINT REYES would appear to be muck free. Their neighborhood used to be a dairy farm.

It was developed in the 1970s by an architect named Virginia Eschenbach into a circle of quirky contemporary houses overlooking acres of pasture and the protected lands of Point Reyes National Seashore.

There is a community garden in the middle, an artisanal cheese shop a few minutes away and, increasingly, kindly neighbors with small children. The drive from San Francisco through canyons of redwoods and pale yellow grazing lands will take your breath away.

“Here everybody is pretty conscious of the fact that good human relations are a necessary fact of life,” Mr. Koren said.

In the middle of the disco war, he was entangled in another ordeal that “nearly unhinged me,” he said.

Although he had been divorced for years, there were unresolved financial issues and he was in the throes of the case, spending two days in a windowless room giving a deposition.

Indeed, though Mr. Koren would not frame it that way, the divorce, from his wife of 18 years, has been the gift that keeps on giving.

The recent legal confrontation prompted his volume on aesthetics, for one; that new work is an attempt to “upscale a bad experience into a philosophical principle,” he said.

For another, when his wife left him in 2003 he found solace in a Viennese flower shop — a place that yielded another book for him.

The flower shop was inspirational and healing, he said, not just lovely to look at (and be in) but devoted to an overall ideal of general niceness. The people who worked there did all sorts of unly things, walking each customer to the door.

Mr. Koren asked if he could just sit there for a few days. “It was very soothing,” he explained. The book that came Mr.

Koren’s Austrian sojourn, “The Flower Shop,” published in 2005, was, in its own quiet way, stunning: it laid out the days and nights of the store cinematically and analytically — a documentary mixed into a philosophical exercise.

The book’s subtitle is a bit of a manifesto for Mr. Koren: “charm, grace, beauty and tenderness in a commercial context.”

Here in Point Reyes, Mr. Koren and Ms. Burchiellaro work side by side on their own projects, though there was some collaboration on the aesthetics book — discussions about fonts, for example, and also Ms.

Burchiellaro’s successful efforts to “get me to be more diplomatic,” Mr. Koren said. “She comes from a noble European tradition” of graciousness, he added. “She helped steer me through self-inflicted damage.

Marco, they agreed, is their best collaboration. Though they never discussed their views on child rearing before his birth, they are in happy alignment as parents.

“Though I did notice, when I first met Emilia,” Mr. Koren said, “that toward animate and inanimate objects she had a very nurturing attitude.

Meaning she would talk to her car and her appliances in a very mothering, coaxing way. I thought that was nice.”

“,”author”:”Penelope Green”,”date_published”:”2010-09-22T23:12:09.000Z”,”lead_image_url”:”https://static01.nyt.com/images/2010/09/23/garden/23leonard-span/23leonard-span-articleLarge.jpg”,”dek”:null,”next_page_url”:null,”url”:”https://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/23/garden/23leonard.html”,”domain”:”www.nytimes.com”,”excerpt”:”Leonard Koren, who has long enjoyed a kind of notoriety among design lovers, has a new house near the wilderness and a new book about just one word: aesthetics.”,”word_count”:1607,”direction”:”ltr”,”total_pages”:1,”rendered_pages”:1}

Source: https://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/23/garden/23leonard.html

15 Best Things to Do in Vienna (Austria)

20 Best Things to Do in Vienna - The Trend Spotter

The Capital of Austria is home to nearly one third of the county’s inhabitants and is its primary city.

This metropolitan city hosts the United Nations organisation and is a major centre for Austria’s culture, economy and Politics.

With many different names the City of Music and the City of dreams, Vienna is renowned throughout the world and has a plethora of stunning historical buildings, gardens and establishments.

Tip – Get the Vienna PASS, this all-inclusive sightseeing pass includes free admission to over 60 top attractions, lots of discounts and unlimited use of the hop-on hop-off bus routes

Ranked as one of the most liveable cities in the world with its inhabitants enjoying a high quality of life, Vienna is a haven in central Europe and remains a popular tourist destination. Listed below are the top must do’s in Vienna and should provide you with more than enough information to plan your trip.

Let’s have a look at the best things to do in Vienna:

1. Schönbrunn Palace

Source: flickr

Schönbrunn Palace

Standing since the 1600’s and holding a major role of cultural importance in Austria, the Schonbrunn Palace is a colossal 1441 room structure and complex that is the main tourist attraction in Vienna.

The Habsburgs have held residence here for many years and indeed emperors of Austria have been born in the palace too.

The palace itself is an immense building and designed in a Baroque style with a symmetrical main building that has hundreds of windows and statues on the rooftop.

Inside the palace are an assortment of rooms all fully furnished and decorated in the original style – You can enjoy a tour through the rooms and admire the sumptuous furnishings and see how Austrian royalty lived.

2. Hourg Palace

Source: flickr

Hourg Palace

The Hourg Palace is another huge palatial complex that pays tribute to the power and influence of the Habsburg dynasty and served as the main winter palace for the rulers of the Austro-Hungarian Empire for hundreds of years.

Today the complex is home to offices of the president of Austria and serves as a presidential base.

The buildings have undergone many additions since their creation in the 13th century and the most impressive of which is the fabulous semi-circular Neue Burg.

Visitors can admire the beauty and style of the baroque architecture, take a tour through the imperial apartments or visit one of the detailed museums in the complex.

Check out the recommended hotels in Vienna, Austria

3. St Stephen’s Cathedral

Source: flickr

St Stephen’s Cathedral, Vienna

This monolithic structure stands proud in the Stephensplatz and has been the most important church in Vienna and Austria since its construction.

The beauty of this building is undeniable and its huge tower dominates the Vienna skyline and stands as the tallest church tower in Austria.

Everything about St Stephen’s Cathedral oozes opulence – From the Romanesque and Gothic design of the exterior, to the dominating pointed tower, and the intricately decorated main roof complete with hundreds of coloured tiles forming an intriguing pattern.

Inside the church there are a total of 18 altars, several smaller chapels, and even some tombs and catacombs.

As an iconic building of Vienna, St Stephens cannot be missed!

4. Schonbrunn Gardens

Source: flickr

Schonbrunn Gardens

Another exceptional part to the Schonbrunn Palace Complex and worthy of a separate visit in its own right, the gardens at Schonbrunn are simply magical.

The grounds of the park extend from the Palace for over a kilometre and you could spend hours walking through the various sections and displays.

You can walk through the Parterre and admire the uniform flower beds, or get lost in the beautiful hedge maze and labyrinth; Neptune’s fountain is a stunning piece of artwork, while there is even an artificial Roman Ruin complete with stone statues.

The crowning glory to all of this is the Gloriette which stands opposite the palace and features a pool and a classical colonnaded long building – Enjoy a drink here in the cafe or simple admire the views of the whole gardens in front of you.

5. Rathaus

Source: wikipedia

Rathaus, Vienna

Vienna is full of historical and significant architecture and the Town Hall located on Rathausplatz is a fine addition to this collection.

A later addition to the city, the Rathaus was constructed in the 1800’s in a Neo-Gothic style to accommodate the offices of the mayor for an ever increasing city population.

Similar in style to the town hall in Brussels, the Rathaus has five towers, the middle of which is the largest and is topped by the iconic Rathausman statue.

Guided tours are available of the inside of the Town Hall on certain days, and this is well worthwhile just to see the extravagant style of the rooms and what it must be to work inside such a wonderful building.

6. Tiergarten Schonbrunn (Vienna Zoo)

Source: flickr

Vienna Zoo

Located within the grounds of the Sconbrunn Palace, the Tiergarten Zoo is the oldest zoo in the world and touts itself as a centre for species preservation and educational fulfilment.

Originally built as a menagerie, the Zoo has several original buildings from that era and mingled together with more modern structures, create a pleasant place to walk through.

The Zoo is home to a myriad of animals from the endangered giant Panda, to Giraffes, Sea Lions and Sloths – There are many talks throughout the day by experienced Zookeepers and even a simulated Amazon rainforest environment to walk through.

As Zoos go, the Vienna Zoo is one of the finest in the world and you can see the care the animals receive.

Tip: The Vienna Zoo is included in the Vienna PASS

7. Belvedere Museum

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Belvedere Museum

This gigantic palatial complex and gardens is split into Upper and Lower Belvedere and served as a summer residence for Austrian princes in the 1600’s.

The two palaces themselves feature amazing architecture and stand out royally in the gardens – Upper Belvedere has a detailed façade with green domed semi-towers while Lower Belvedere has a simpler design; both palaces face the stunning gardens.

Sights at the Belvedere Museum include the two palaces which hold a staggering collection of artwork and decorated staterooms and the expansive landscape gardens complete with pools and an Orangery.

8. Vienna State Opera

Source: flickr

Vienna State Opera

Opera and fine architecture is synonymous with Vienna, and the Vienna State Opera provides both in abundance.

This outstanding building is located centrally in the Innere Stadt district and is considered one of the finest Opera Houses in the world.

The exterior has a Neo-Renaissance style and is characterised by its many arches and arched windows, while the interior is extremely decadent and feels more a palace than a place of musical celebration.

Daily guided tours are available which last around 40 minutes and give a good overview of the building.

If you wanted to see a live concert or Opera, you would need to research what is showing before your visit and buy tickets.

Available activity: Mozart & Strauss Concert at the Vienna State Opera

9. Vienna Natural History Museum

Source: flickr

Vienna Natural History Museum

Housed in a sophisticated palace complex that is typical of the historical architecture in Vienna, the Natural History Museum has a huge collection of minerals, precious stones, meteorites, fossils, skeletons of animals, displays of various insects and mammals and even some taxidermy of extinct species.

With over 30 million objects the museum’s collection is one of the most important in Europe and new additions are arriving all the time.

This fascinating venue also has a digital planetarium where you can see intriguing films about the earth and its development.

Adults and children a will love the sheer amount of information and eye-boggling displays in this epic museum.

10. Prater Amusement Park

Source: flickr

Prater Amusement Park

What could be a more enjoyable way to experience Vienna than having a fun packed day at the Prater Amusement Park? The Wiener Prater Park was once a hunting ground that developed into a public space for food stands and small amusement stalls, it now hosts the impressive Amusement Park and is free to enter (You pay for the individual rides instead). Inside the park is a multitude of rides and stalls including a huge Ferris wheel, bumper cars, carousels and hair-raising rollercoasters.

There are also such things as shooting ranges, a wax works display and a light gauge railway to keep you entertained.

If rides and thrills are not your kind of thing, there are several restaurants and cafes in the park to sit back and enjoy the scenery in.

11. The Spanish Riding School

Source: wikipedia

Spanish Riding School, Vienna

One of the finest institutes for classical dressage in the world, and a long-standing renowned tradition In Austria, The Spanish Riding School has been responsible for training horses in the art of dressage for hundreds of years.

The riding school as built during the Habsburg Monarchy and has stood ever since.

The building is open to the public and you can watch demonstrations and in some cases training sessions too.

For anyone who loves riding this is a must see in Vienna, while even for non-riders you can still appreciate the passion and love that is put into this art form.

Available activity: Spanish Riding School 2-Hour Morning Exercise

12. Donauturm (Viewing tower)

Source: flickr

Donauturm (on the right)

Listed in the tallest 75 free-standing towers in the world at a whopping 252m, the Donauturm stands as an observation tower in the Donaustadt district of Vienna.

The Donauturm stands out against the relatively low-rise skyline of Vienna and is easily recognisable; the structure contains radio transmitters and cell phone antennae, two revolving restaurants, and observation platform and even a bungie jumping gangway.

The tower provides a fantastic and different way to see Vienna and it is easy to see why it draws so many visitors.

Check out the recommended hotels in Vienna, Austria

13. Naschmarkt

Source: flickr

Naschmarkt, Vienna

Market places often define a city and give a good representation of its heritage and culture, they are engaging places to walk through and provide tourists with an authentic slice of local life.

The Naschmarkt is held on the Wienzeile street and stretches for around 1.5km, full of stalls selling anything from fresh fruit and vegetables to herbs, cheese and seafood.

The atmosphere, sounds, sights and smells are tantalising and the grand scale of the market make it famous world-wide.

14. Vienna Ring Road

Source: flickr

Ringstraße

The opulent Ring Road that surrounds the Innere Stadt district of Vienna was especially constructed in the 19th century after the removal of the city walls.

It features eclectic architecture and has many famous buildings lining its pavements.

The road itself is wide and is framed by the cities tram line which remains an important mode of transport, there are also sections lined with trees and the road proves a great cycle route.

It is well worth walking on parts of the ring road to see its importance and also the beautiful buildings that frame it.

15. Vienna Woods

Source: flickr

Vienna Woods

At the foothills of the Northern Limestone Alps, the Vienna Woods lie to the west of the city and span some 45km.

Several rivers form the boundaries of the woods or Wienerwald and the area is popular with both Austrians looking to escape the city, and tourists looking to enjoy the beautiful Austrian countryside.

The woods are full of hidden gems from underground boat rides (The seegrotte) to Hunting Lodges and small villages untouched by the expanse of Vienna.

There are companies that provide half day tours, or you could simple do some research and form your own itinerary – The possibilities are endless in this alluring part of Austria.

Source: https://www.thecrazytourist.com/15-best-things-vienna-austria/

Highlights of Vienna

20 Best Things to Do in Vienna - The Trend Spotter
Head to Vienna for ballet performances, food tours and more © Romas_Photo / Lonely Planet

In the summertime, from 3-10 August, the annual Calle Libre festival for Urban Aesthetics is celebrated across Vienna.

This street art festival, founded by Jakob Kettner to bring together live paintings, street art works, guided tours, film screenings and workshops for urban aesthetics, is a chance to explore Vienna’s burgeoning street art scene and discover works from local and international artists.

Check out the city's thriving craft beer scene © EddieHernandezPhotography / Lonely Planet

Craft beer has finally come of age in Vienna with a number of bars now specialising in locally made brews.

Just off Mariahilferstrasse, Ammutson Craft Beer Dive's commitment to fresh tap beer from local microbreweries is a welcome addition to the scene.

Stalwart craft beer venues Beaver Brewing Company and Brickmakers Pub & Kitchen continue to provide a hearty mix of delicious food, alongside their expansive and regularly changing craft beer menus.

Get the best view of Vienna from the Donauturm tower © photo.ua / Shutterstock

The newly renovated Donauturm tower offers panoramic views across the city and the Danube river, and is one of the highest perspectives from which to view the entire surrounding region of Vienna. With its updated take on original 1960’s modern architecture, you can enjoy the refined rotating restaurant at a height of 170m, or grab a coffee in the more casual Turm Cafe at 160m high.

Strap on your walking boots for the annual autumn wine hiking day © Greg Elms / Lonely Planet

The hills surrounding Vienna are awash with vineyards and views, ripe for hiking and tippling in equal measure. Held in autumn (typically late September), the annual wine hiking day sees over 190 winemakers set up small wooden huts along the popular walking paths above Vienna, where thirsty hikers can stop in to try the fresh wine harvest of the year.

Pick up your glass from one of the hiking-day stations at the bottom of the trail, and meander your way from Neustift to Nussdorf, Strebersdorf to Stammersdorf, or the shorter Ottakring to Neuwald route. The ‘hikes’ themselves are quite low impact and allow plenty of time to stop, sip and enjoy the fresh air.

There are 'wurst' ways to spend a day than with a local food tour of Viennese cuisine © Krzysztof Dydynski / Lonely Planet

Founded by  local couple Melinda and Thomas, the Vienna Food Tour offers insider knowledge of a variety of cuisines that influenced Viennese food. The tour, hosted by Viennese natives, takes you to different, seasonally appropriate, locations where you can sample some of the best food and drinks. Get in fast as there are limited dates to book your authentic Viennese eating experience.

Hang out with locals at Copa Cagrana beach © Kirill Neiezhmakov / Shutterstock

Just beyond the city centre, nestled by the Donauinsel, lies Copa Cagrana Beach, a stretch of sandy beach bars, pop-up food stalls and a large open-air TV viewing area that locals flock to in the summer months.

Open between June and September, you have to be quick to enjoy the beach atmosphere, volleyball courts, trampolines and green space beside the water. Nibble on delicate Trześniewski sandwiches (open finger sandwiches) as you look across the Donaukanal, or satiate your summer cravings with a fresh spritzer at Wienerwessweinwunderbar.

Seeking a true digital detox can be challenging, with a constant barrage of tech an unavoidable part of our daily lives. To help you stay offline and relax, 25 Hours hotel has collaborated with Supersense analogue cafe to create the first ‘analogue hotel room’ for your perfectly curated escape from modern life.

Replacing wi-fi and wide screens with a typewriter, VHS player and vinyl records, the suite offers a stylish retreat to the simpler technologies of decades gone by. Perfect for a truly unplugged weekend getaway.

Turn insects into ingredients at a ZIRP cooking course © Praisaeng / Lonely Planet

Explore the emerging trend in sustainable eating – insect-based food – with a cooking course. Utilising high-quality insects sourced from Austria and Europe, bred specifically for consumption with professional chefs to guide your experience, the ZIRP cooking course is designed to feed and educate concurrently.

A five-course menu and background information on the advantages of insect-based eating, offer a unique experience to usher your tastebuds into the growing world of crunching down on creepy crawlies.

The 15th district is experiencing a rejuvenation thanks to community driven events, interesting stores and markets.

Brunch and coffee lovers can get their fill at Landkind, Das Augustin and Turnhalle im Brick 5, and see Austria’s best barista slinging lattes at GOTA Coffee Experts.

Hidden down the district's side alleys is the unique indie art gallery, Improper Walls, and quirky stores such as Metaware, a ‘gift shop for nerds & geeks’.

In the evenings, there’s a wealth of food and drink options to explore in the district, from Das Eduard’s pita burgers on its outdoor terrace, to indie bar ein affee and wine haven Reinwein. Vegetarians can enjoy the secluded delights of restaurant and art gallery Hollerei, a short walk from Meidling Hauptstrasse station.

This article was first published in May 2019, last updated in February 2020.

Source: https://www.lonelyplanet.com/articles/best-things-to-do-in-vienna

Do You Have a Future in Trendspotting? 9 Ways to Tell

20 Best Things to Do in Vienna - The Trend Spotter

Just as a matchmaker might possess a second sense about which people will fall in love, as a leading trendspotter, I’ve developed a methodology to foresee how a culture will react to a new idea, product or experience.

Yet, some key character traits make people good trendspotters regardless of their chosen careers and interests.

In this updated excerpt from “Agile PR,” we tell you how to know whether or not scanning is in your DNA:

 1. You’re a voracious and eclectic reader. At the heart of everything a trendspotter does, pattern recognition is typically a systematic survey of newspapers, magazines, websites and other media for indications of important changes that occur through time.

Trendspotters’ reading lists include anything and everything, from perusing Go Fug Yourself while getting a pedicure to scanning The Atlantic over breakfast to devouring The Economist during lunch, from noodling the latest postings on psfk.

com when you get your coffee to sleepily reading the local paper on the train back to Hometown, USA.

2. You have a sharp wit. Trendspotting is a fast-paced art, and although the science of it requires thoughtfulness, the art is selling your perspective in 140 characters or less, including that branded hashtag. Trendspotters can summarize enormous cultural shifts within brilliant tweet- expressions.

3. You’re nerdy for data.

 Anybody with the skills, patience and interest to dive into reports and stats produced by bodies such as the Census Bureau, the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the various arms of Pew and the thousands of academic institutions now searchable on the internet will have a leg up in the trendspotting game. Diving into all this data definitely won’t earn the swagger points of hanging out at SXSW or CES, but for the keen-eyed trend sleuth, they can turn up some fascinating insights.

4. You have the curiosity of an anthropologist. The best way to find out what people are doing is to watch them doing it in real life. Rather than asking what people are wearing to parties and what they’re drinking, for instance, just go and see for yourself.

This approach requires skilled observation and a great familiarity with the context in order to grasp cues and interpret what they mean, but even a minute or two can be enough to identify a look or behavior that’s the ordinary.

Somebody who appears to the unseasoned eye as an out-of-touch outsider behaving eccentrically might actually be the alpha who is onto something that will spread wildfire when others catch on.

5. You’ve got a knack for being in the right place at the right time. Trade shows, fashion and retail shows (including the big fashion weeks in New York, London and Paris, plus the MAGIC show in Las Vegas), auto/motor shows (Detroit, Geneva, Paris, Shanghai), advertising and PR creativity shows (e.g.

, Cannes Lions, D&AD) and buzzy magnet events such as Sundance and SXSW pull in hordes of people at the cutting edge. Attending such events might not yield any trendspotting scoops (everyone else will be looking for scoops, too), but it’s a surefire way of catching up and staying caught up.

Ideas- and innovation-focused festivals the Aspen Ideas Festival and Fast Company Innovation Festival are making it especially easy to sniff the wind for what’s next. Consciously or otherwise, attendees will be eating, drinking, thinking and talking about what’s new and hot.

Conferences that are considered essential to attend vary from year to year—for example, in 2018, CES will be more influential than ever while the significance (and expense) of the Cannes Lions is suddenly questionable.

6. You’re a scenario planner and big-picture thinker. Often, the most seismic trends flagged by trendspotters began as bits of random information that were then placed into a bigger strategic context of implications and opportunities.

For example, if the statistics shout loud and clear that growing numbers of 18- to 29-year-olds are either not leaving their parents’ homes or are returning to live there after college, this is a trend, but not a particularly newsworthy or insightful one.

A trendspotter would delve deeper, combing through statistics that also show that millions of twentysomethings have delayed entering the workforce by staying in school, taking nonpaying internships or seasonal work, joining AmeriCorps or finding other creative ways to stay busy in the absence of actual employment.

They will explore how decades hence these trends will have influenced delayed adulthood and new parent–child dynamics, spawned new businesses, art movements and social enterprises and resulted in financial, social and psychological issues.

7. You have intimate knowledge of your audience. My method of trendspotting requires me to know my consumer inside and out. It’s not the stuff that’s splashed on the front page about said consumer, but the stuff he’d whisper in your ear if he were your lover. It’s the ability to get that intimate, “insider” intelligence that makes a good trendspotter a great one.

8. You manage risk well. A big part of this business is risk management. While you’re gaming around the what-ifs, you have to anticipate the worst, plan for the best and have three or four backup options at your disposal if you want to survive.

9. You know how to write a sensational headline. A trendspotter has the ability to attract media interest, bringing trends to life and to the forefront of newsmaking. This pursuit is not at all about personal promotion.

Rather, you must think in terms of furthering the interests of your employer or clients. (When I popularized the “metrosexual” man a decade ago, it was for the purpose of creating a marketplace for SAB Miller’s Peroni.

Same goes with my “sleep is the new sex” concept, which reverberated with tired people around the world—and The New York Times. I dreamed it up primarily as a way to market flatbeds for an airline client.

) Excellent trendspotters have developed an instinct for a “hook,” something that will resonate with the media, always hungry to latch on to the next big thing.

Just as a matchmaker might possess a second sense about which people will fall in love, as a leading trendspotter, I’ve developed a methodology to foresee how a culture will react to a new idea, product or experience.

Yet, some key character traits make people good trendspotters regardless of their chosen careers and interests.

In this updated excerpt from “Agile PR,” we tell you how to know whether or not scanning is in your DNA:

 1. You’re a voracious and eclectic reader. At the heart of everything a trendspotter does, pattern recognition is typically a systematic survey of newspapers, magazines, websites and other media for indications of important changes that occur through time.

Trendspotters’ reading lists include anything and everything, from perusing Go Fug Yourself while getting a pedicure to scanning The Atlantic over breakfast to devouring The Economist during lunch, from noodling the latest postings on psfk.

com when you get your coffee to sleepily reading the local paper on the train back to Hometown, USA.

2. You have a sharp wit. Trendspotting is a fast-paced art, and although the science of it requires thoughtfulness, the art is selling your perspective in 140 characters or less, including that branded hashtag. Trendspotters can summarize enormous cultural shifts within brilliant tweet- expressions.

3. You’re nerdy for data.

 Anybody with the skills, patience and interest to dive into reports and stats produced by bodies such as the Census Bureau, the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the various arms of Pew and the thousands of academic institutions now searchable on the internet will have a leg up in the trendspotting game. Diving into all this data definitely won’t earn the swagger points of hanging out at SXSW or CES, but for the keen-eyed trend sleuth, they can turn up some fascinating insights.

4. You have the curiosity of an anthropologist. The best way to find out what people are doing is to watch them doing it in real life. Rather than asking what people are wearing to parties and what they’re drinking, for instance, just go and see for yourself.

This approach requires skilled observation and a great familiarity with the context in order to grasp cues and interpret what they mean, but even a minute or two can be enough to identify a look or behavior that’s the ordinary.

Somebody who appears to the unseasoned eye as an out-of-touch outsider behaving eccentrically might actually be the alpha who is onto something that will spread wildfire when others catch on.

5. You’ve got a knack for being in the right place at the right time. Trade shows, fashion and retail shows (including the big fashion weeks in New York, London and Paris, plus the MAGIC show in Las Vegas), auto/motor shows (Detroit, Geneva, Paris, Shanghai), advertising and PR creativity shows (e.g.

, Cannes Lions, D&AD) and buzzy magnet events such as Sundance and SXSW pull in hordes of people at the cutting edge. Attending such events might not yield any trendspotting scoops (everyone else will be looking for scoops, too), but it’s a surefire way of catching up and staying caught up.

Ideas- and innovation-focused festivals the Aspen Ideas Festival and Fast Company Innovation Festival are making it especially easy to sniff the wind for what’s next. Consciously or otherwise, attendees will be eating, drinking, thinking and talking about what’s new and hot.

Conferences that are considered essential to attend vary from year to year—for example, in 2018, CES will be more influential than ever while the significance (and expense) of the Cannes Lions is suddenly questionable.

6. You’re a scenario planner and big-picture thinker. Often, the most seismic trends flagged by trendspotters began as bits of random information that were then placed into a bigger strategic context of implications and opportunities.

For example, if the statistics shout loud and clear that growing numbers of 18- to 29-year-olds are either not leaving their parents’ homes or are returning to live there after college, this is a trend, but not a particularly newsworthy or insightful one.

A trendspotter would delve deeper, combing through statistics that also show that millions of twentysomethings have delayed entering the workforce by staying in school, taking nonpaying internships or seasonal work, joining AmeriCorps or finding other creative ways to stay busy in the absence of actual employment.

They will explore how decades hence these trends will have influenced delayed adulthood and new parent–child dynamics, spawned new businesses, art movements and social enterprises and resulted in financial, social and psychological issues.

7. You have intimate knowledge of your audience. My method of trendspotting requires me to know my consumer inside and out. It’s not the stuff that’s splashed on the front page about said consumer, but the stuff he’d whisper in your ear if he were your lover. It’s the ability to get that intimate, “insider” intelligence that makes a good trendspotter a great one.

8. You manage risk well. A big part of this business is risk management. While you’re gaming around the what-ifs, you have to anticipate the worst, plan for the best and have three or four backup options at your disposal if you want to survive.

9. You know how to write a sensational headline. A trendspotter has the ability to attract media interest, bringing trends to life and to the forefront of newsmaking. This pursuit is not at all about personal promotion.

Rather, you must think in terms of furthering the interests of your employer or clients. (When I popularized the “metrosexual” man a decade ago, it was for the purpose of creating a marketplace for SAB Miller’s Peroni.

Same goes with my “sleep is the new sex” concept, which reverberated with tired people around the world—and The New York Times. I dreamed it up primarily as a way to market flatbeds for an airline client.

) Excellent trendspotters have developed an instinct for a “hook,” something that will resonate with the media, always hungry to latch on to the next big thing.

Source: https://download.havas.com/posts/do-you-have-a-future-in-trendspotting-9-ways-to-tell/

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